My favourite storybooks part 2

June 17, 2011 § Leave a comment

The next book I would like to share with you is ‘Dinner with Fox’ by Stephen Wyllie and Korky Paul (seems he’s one of my favourite illustrators). A bit more info about the book you can finde here: http://www.korkypaul.com/popfox.html

Why do I like this book? First of all it has got a nice bit of black humour in it. Secondly the language is fab even though for most younger learners a bit too difficult. I actually use it with my pre-teens in the original version, but with younger ones change the words, or just tell them the story in my own words. But the best of it is that it is actually an interactive pop-up book, so you can actually look into the cupboard, open the pots, and take the letters out of the postbox and read them.

Well, this is how I used it in one of  my pre-teens classes (11-12 years old). I had to revise the first conditional with them and instead of getting it just on the board, eliciting all they knew, I wanted to try a different way how to revise it. So I showed them the cover of the book and let them describe it, and give guesses what might happen in the story. They came up with quite a lot of things and ideas. Then we looked at the first page where you can actually look in his larder which is fairly empty (just a carrot and potatoe).  Then I asked them, if that was enough for a hungry fox. Of course not! So if the fox is hungry and doesn’t have anything to eat, what do you think he will do? So they brainstormed and then we checked the next page to see if they were right. The next page shows him writing a letter to his dear friend hen. So, if he writes a letter to his friend hen, what do you think will happen? …. This way I went through the whole book with them. It was great to see how they got really hooked up with the story and brainstormed a lot of ideas, and at the same time were using the first conditional.

In an adapted form this works with quite  a few books. And as long as the illustrations and the plot are funny and have a twist it works well with older children or even teens.

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